Scaling Printable Scenery Models

Every 3D printer comes with software that you will need to use to send files to your printer for printing; this software is called a Slicer. You can use this Slicer to scale the models before printing

Below is an example of how you scale in the ‘Cura’ Slicer. Each slicer has a different interface, but they all have the ability to scale

All our models are usually scaled to 28mm standard Wargame size. If not, then we state the scale on the product page.

Approximate scale recommendations

  • 140% — 40mm – Print at .2
  • 114% — 32mm  — print at .2
  • 0% —  28mm — print at .2
  • 60% — 15mm — print at .2
  • 33% — 10mm — print at .1
  • 24% — 6mm — print at .05

 

  • 28mm = 1/58 – Normally models are mounted on a 25mm round base. (the average man is 1 inch (1.65 meters) high,  not including the base)
  • 37mm = 1/43.5 Railroad O gauge (railroad).

When we design a model, we are careful not to push the printer to its limits. This leaves room for scaling up and down.
For example, the window lattice work on the house section is fine at 28mm, but when we scale the house to 15mm the lattice work is not starting to get relatively smaller. As the model scales down the printer is trying to print very fine uprights and begins to get close to its maximum tolerance.

Bolt Action House
French House printed at 100% (28mm) and 60% (15mm)

You can use Sid Scale to see how your models will look before printing

Sid Scale is labled by his base size, so 28mm will be the 25mm base which is 35mm high to allow for a 4mm base height and 1mm hat

 

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4 responses to “Scaling Printable Scenery Models”

  1. KenH says:

    I usually work in Solidworks in inches, and build items for On30 narrow gauge model railroading. the 28mm Wargame size is foreign to me. Can you explain the relationship between that scale and O scale (1/4″ to the foot)? The MakerBot software I use for printing on my Replicator 2X doesn’t make re-scaling very easy. Or maybe it’s just me.

    • Matt Barker says:

      28mm is often referred to as 1:56. If you make calculations to other scales based on 1:56 you should be fine.

      Note: Wargame scale isn’t an exact science like Hobby Railway. Often things are designed to look good, fit on the battlefield and be ‘playable.’

  2. Dan Crandell says:

    so if I bought 15mm scaled models. What do I do in cura software to make them 28mm? current cura has either 100% which is default for every model brought into it, or mm. so for 15mm would I just increase it from 100% to 185%?

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